Dave Lochbaum

Director, Nuclear Safety Project

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Mr. Lochbaum received a BS in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Tennessee in 1979 and worked as a nuclear engineer in nuclear power plants for 17 years. In 1992, he and a colleague identified a safety problem in a plant where they were working. When their concerns were ignored by the plant manager, the utility, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), they took the issue to Congress. The problem was eventually corrected at the original plant and at plants across the country. Lochbaum joined UCS in 1996 to work on nuclear power safety. He spent a year in 2009-10 working at the NRC Training Center in Tennessee. Areas of expertise: Nuclear power safety, nuclear technology and plant design, regulatory oversight, plant license renewal and decommissioning

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Tennessee Valley Authority’s Nuclear Safety Culture Déjà vu

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a Confirmatory Order to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on July 27, 2017.  An NRC team inspecting the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant in fall 2016 determined that TVA failed to comply with elements of another Confirmatory Order that NRC had issued to TVA on December 22, 2009. Specifically, the 2009 Confirmatory Action required TVA to implement measures at all its nuclear plant sites (i.e., Watts Bar and Sequoyah in Tennessee and Browns Ferry in Alabama) to ensure that adverse employment actions against workers conformed to the NRC’s employee protection regulations and whether the actions could negatively impact the safety conscious work environment. The NRC inspection team determined that TVA was not implementing several of the ordered measures at Watts Bar. Read more >

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Broken Valve in Emergency System at LaSalle Nuclear Plant

An NRC Special Inspection Team (SIT) conducted an inspection at the LaSalle Nuclear Plant this spring to investigate the cause of a valve’s failure and assess the effectiveness of the corrective actions taken. Read more >

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NRC’s Decision Making: 18 Reasons Why You Are Right, but Wrong

As described in a prior blog post, the Unit 3 reactor at the Palo Verde Generating Station had one of two emergency diesel generators (EDGs) explode during a test run. The license issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) allowed the reactor to remain running for up to 10 days with one EDG unavailable. Fixing the heavily damaged EDG would require far longer than 10 days, so the plant’s owner submitted requests to the NRC for its permission to run the reactor for up to 21 days and then up to 62 days with only one EDG available. Read more >

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Marijuana and Nuclear Power Plants

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) adopted regulations in the mid-1980s seeking to ensure that nuclear power plant workers are fit for duty. The NRC’s regulations contained provisions seeking to verify that workers were trustworthy and reliable as well as measures intended to prevent workers from being impaired on duty. The former measures included background checks before workers could gain access to the plant while the latter components included drug and alcohol testing. Read more >

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Nuclear Plant Cyber Security

There has been considerable media coverage recently about alleged hacking into computer systems at or for U.S. nuclear power plants. The good news is that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the nuclear industry are not merely reacting to this news and playing catch-up to the cyber threat. The NRC included cyber security protective measures among the regulatory requirements it imposed on the nuclear industry in the wake of 9/11. The hacking reported to date seems to have involved non-critical systems at nuclear plants as explained below.

The bad news is that there are bad people out there trying to do bad things to good people. We are better protected against cyber attacks than we were 15 years ago, but are not invulnerable to them. Read more >

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