Dave Lochbaum

Director, Nuclear Safety Project

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Mr. Lochbaum received a BS in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Tennessee in 1979 and worked as a nuclear engineer in nuclear power plants for 17 years. In 1992, he and a colleague identified a safety problem in a plant where they were working. When their concerns were ignored by the plant manager, the utility, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), they took the issue to Congress. The problem was eventually corrected at the original plant and at plants across the country. Lochbaum joined UCS in 1996 to work on nuclear power safety. He spent a year in 2009-10 working at the NRC Training Center in Tennessee. Areas of expertise: Nuclear power safety, nuclear technology and plant design, regulatory oversight, plant license renewal and decommissioning

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Dave's Latest Posts

Palo Verde: Running Without a Backup Power Supply

The Arizona Public Service Company’s Palo Verde Generating Station about 60 miles west of Phoenix has three Combustion Engineering pressurized water reactors that began operating in the mid 1980s. In the early morning hours of Thursday, December 15, 2016, workers started one of two emergency diesel generators (EDGs) on the Unit 3 reactor for a routine test. The EDGs are the third tier of electrical power to emergency equipment for Unit 3. Read more >

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TVA’s Nuclear Allegators

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) receives reports about potential safety problems from plant workers, the public, members of the news media, and elected officials. The NRC calls these potential safety problems allegations, making the sources allegators. In the five years between 2012 and 2016, the NRC received 450 to 600 allegations each year. The majority of the allegations involve the nuclear power reactors licensed by the NRC. Read more >

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Ad Hoc Fire Protection at Nuclear Plants Not Good Enough

A fire at a nuclear reactor is serious business. There are many ways to trigger a nuclear accident leading to damage of the reactor core, which can result in the release of radiation. But according to a senior manager at the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), for a typical nuclear reactor, roughly half the risk that the reactor core will be damaged is due to the risk of fire. In other words, the odds that a fire will cause an accident leading to core damage equals that from all other causes combined. And that risk estimate assumes the fire protection regulations are being met. Read more >

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Exelon Generation Company (a.k.a. Nuclear Whiners)

The Unit 3 reactor at the Dresden Nuclear Power Station near Morris, Illinois is a boiling water reactor with a Mark I containment design that began operating in 1971. On June 27, 2016, operators manually started the high pressure coolant injection (HPCI) system for a test run required every quarter by the reactor’s operating license. Soon after starting HPCI, alarms sounded in the main control room. The operators shut down the HPCI system and dispatched equipment operators to the HPCI room in the reactor building to investigate the problem.

The equipment operators opened the HPCI room door and saw flames around the HPCI system’s auxiliary oil pump motor and the room filling with smoke. They reported the fire to the control room operators and used a portable extinguisher to put out the fire within three minutes. Read more >

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Watts Bar Lacks a Proper Safety Culture

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a Chilled Work Environment Letter to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on March 23, 2016, about safety culture problems at the Watts Bar nuclear plant. TVA promised to take steps to restore a proper safety culture at the plant.

Nearly 13 months later, has a proper safety culture been restored at Watts Bar? Read more >

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