Lisbeth Gronlund

Co-director and senior scientist

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Dr. Gronlund received her PhD in physics from Cornell University in 1989. She was a postdoctoral fellow at the MIT Defense and Arms Control Studies Program and an SSRC-MacArthur Foundation Fellow in International Peace and Security at the Center for International Security Studies at the University of Maryland. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Physical Society (APS), and was a recipient of the APS Joseph A. Burton Forum Award in 2001. She has been at UCS since 1992. Areas of expertise: U.S. nuclear weapons and nuclear weapons policy, nuclear terrorism and international fissile material control, ballistic missile defense. Lisbeth also blogs on the Equation.

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Lisbeth's Latest Posts

U.S. Plays Word Games in Statement about Alert Level of Nuclear Weapons

On Tuesday, the U.S. delegation to the 2015 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference in New York issued a statement on the alert level of U.S. nuclear weapons.

Unfortunately, the statement is disingenuous and misleading, and relies on word games to obfuscate the real issues. It inappropriately seeks to dispel NPT delegates’ concerns about the U.S. practice of keeping nuclear missiles ready to be launched within minutes, giving the president the option of launching these missiles based on warning of an incoming attack. Read more >

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Penny Wise & Pound Foolish: Cuts to Basic Science at the Weapons Labs

The U.S. nuclear weapons laboratories have a program that allows their scientists and other researchers to conduct independent research and development (R&D) on subjects unrelated to the primary missions of the labs. This program—the Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program—allows the labs to set aside up to 8% of their budgets each year for such R&D. Grants are awarded competitively, and funded by overhead charged by each laboratory to both its DOE and non-DOE sponsors. Read more >

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UCS Report on the Future of the U.S. Nuclear Weapons Complex

complex report coverToday we released our report Making Smart Security Choices, which takes a broad look at the U.S. nuclear weapons complex and assesses what is going well and what needs improving, what there is too much and too little of, and how to make its work consistent with the U.S. commitment to further reducing its arsenal.

In part, the report looks at current plans for building new facilities and argues for cancelling or postponing some of them. Read more >

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New U.S. Nuclear Weapons Guidance: Not Bold Enough

President Obama gave a speech in Berlin today that included a paragraph about nuclear weapons: Read more >

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Time to Reduce Nuclear Dangers

Dick Garwin and I recently wrote an op-ed making the case that it’s time for the United States to take steps to reduce the dangers posed by large nuclear arsenals. We argue that President Obama should reduce the total U.S. arsenal—short-range and long-range, deployed and stored—to 1,000 weapons and eliminate the U.S. policy of launch-on-warning.

The op-ed has been published in a number of papers, including here.


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