Nuclear Power Safety

The probability of a nuclear accident is small but the consequences can be catastrophic. Our experts analyze nuclear safety issues from the past and present, making recommendations for a safer nuclear fleet.


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Latest Nuclear Power Safety Posts

Trump Administration Blocks Government Scientists from Attending International Meeting on Nuclear Power

, senior scientist

The Trump administration has barred the participation of US government technical experts on nuclear energy from attending a major international conference in Russia. Read more >

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Nuclear Leaks: The Back Story the NRC Doesn’t Want You to Know about Palo Verde

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

As described in a recent All Things Nuclear commentary, one of two emergency diesel generators (EDGs) for the Unit 3 reactor at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generation Station in Arizona was severely damaged during a test run on December 15, 2016. The operating license issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) allowed the reactor to continue running for up to 10 days with one EDG out of service. Because the extensive damage required far longer than 10 days to repair, the owner asked the NRC for permission to continue operating Unit 3 for up to 62 days with only one EDG available. The NRC approved that request. Read more >

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Oyster Creek Reactor: Bad Nuclear Vibrations

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

The Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station near Forked River, New Jersey is the oldest nuclear power plant operating in the United States. It began operating in 1969 around the time Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were hiking the lunar landscape. Read more >

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Increase in Cancer Risk for Japanese Workers Accidentally Exposed to Plutonium

, senior scientist

According to news reports, five workers were accidentally exposed to high levels of radiation at the Oarai nuclear research and development center in Tokai-mura, Japan on June 6th. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency, the operator of the facility, reported that five workers inhaled plutonium and americium that was released from a storage container that the workers had opened. The radioactive materials were contained in two plastic bags, but they had apparently ripped.

We wish to express our sympathy for the victims of this accident. Read more >

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Palo Verde: Running Without a Backup Power Supply

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

The Arizona Public Service Company’s Palo Verde Generating Station about 60 miles west of Phoenix has three Combustion Engineering pressurized water reactors that began operating in the mid 1980s. In the early morning hours of Thursday, December 15, 2016, workers started one of two emergency diesel generators (EDGs) on the Unit 3 reactor for a routine test. The EDGs are the third tier of electrical power to emergency equipment for Unit 3. Read more >

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