Nuclear Power Safety

The probability of a nuclear accident is small but the consequences can be catastrophic. Our experts analyze nuclear safety issues from the past and present, making recommendations for a safer nuclear fleet.


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Latest Nuclear Power Safety Posts

Oyster Creek Reactor: Bad Nuclear Vibrations

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

The Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station near Forked River, New Jersey is the oldest nuclear power plant operating in the United States. It began operating in 1969 around the time Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were hiking the lunar landscape. Read more >

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Increase in Cancer Risk for Japanese Workers Accidentally Exposed to Plutonium

, senior scientist

According to news reports, five workers were accidentally exposed to high levels of radiation at the Oarai nuclear research and development center in Tokai-mura, Japan on June 6th. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency, the operator of the facility, reported that five workers inhaled plutonium and americium that was released from a storage container that the workers had opened. The radioactive materials were contained in two plastic bags, but they had apparently ripped.

We wish to express our sympathy for the victims of this accident. Read more >

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Palo Verde: Running Without a Backup Power Supply

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

The Arizona Public Service Company’s Palo Verde Generating Station about 60 miles west of Phoenix has three Combustion Engineering pressurized water reactors that began operating in the mid 1980s. In the early morning hours of Thursday, December 15, 2016, workers started one of two emergency diesel generators (EDGs) on the Unit 3 reactor for a routine test. The EDGs are the third tier of electrical power to emergency equipment for Unit 3. Read more >

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TVA’s Nuclear Allegators

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) receives reports about potential safety problems from plant workers, the public, members of the news media, and elected officials. The NRC calls these potential safety problems allegations, making the sources allegators. In the five years between 2012 and 2016, the NRC received 450 to 600 allegations each year. The majority of the allegations involve the nuclear power reactors licensed by the NRC. Read more >

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Ad Hoc Fire Protection at Nuclear Plants Not Good Enough

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

A fire at a nuclear reactor is serious business. There are many ways to trigger a nuclear accident leading to damage of the reactor core, which can result in the release of radiation. But according to a senior manager at the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), for a typical nuclear reactor, roughly half the risk that the reactor core will be damaged is due to the risk of fire. In other words, the odds that a fire will cause an accident leading to core damage equals that from all other causes combined. And that risk estimate assumes the fire protection regulations are being met. Read more >

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