Update on the NRC Seven: Petitioning the NRC over safety

, director, Nuclear Safety Project | May 26, 2016, 11:35 am EST
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Earlier this year, I blogged about seven NRC employees who petitioned the NRC to take enforcement action against plant owners for violating regulatory requirements (such as General Design Criterion 17) related to an open phase condition. This safety problem affects every operating nuclear plant in the U.S. except Seabrook in New Hampshire.

UPDATE

On May 17, 2016, the NRC staff discussed the Open Phase Condition with the agency’s Committee to Review Generic Requirements (CRGR). The NRC staff described the problem and its history. On slide 17, the staff outlined its plans to handle the issue:

So, the NRC staff plans to ENFORE CURRENT REQUIREMENTS.

Unless plant owners violate the current requirements.

In that case, the NRC staff plans to GRANT ENFORCEMENT DISCRETION to allow reactors with inoperable electric power systems to continue cranking out profits. Profit once again placed ahead, way ahead, of public safety.

NRC’s regulations are developed to protect public health and safety. The NRC allows plant owners to comply with these regulations, or not to comply with them. Whichever is most convenient for the moneymakers.

Check out the NRC’s full presentation to the CRGR (and verify that I didn’t Photoshop this crazy NRC antic).

Posted in: Nuclear Power Safety Tags: , ,

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