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Command and Control

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

Disaster by Design/Safety by Intent #17

Disaster by Design

Command and control is often used to describe the authority of military leaders in directing armed forces in battle. It can also refer to senior managers at nuclear power plants and the resources they command and control to fend off safety challenges.

Faulty intelligence, or flawed situational awareness, undermines command and control when leaders have the wrong understanding of hazards and/or response capabilities. Read more >

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Ground-based Midcourse Missile Defense Test Slated for Thursday

, senior scientist

A test of the Ground-based Interceptor (GBI) is scheduled for Thursday, January 28, sometime between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Pacific Standard Time. Read more >

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Davis-Besse’s Forgotten Fix

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

Disaster by Design/Safety by Intent #16

Disaster by Design

The Davis-Besse nuclear plant near Oak Harbor, Ohio is probably best known for a small leak of borated water from the reactor vessel between 1996 and 2002 that corroded six inches of the vessel’s head exposing its stainless steel liner. That quarter-inch thick liner was all that kept the plant from experiencing a very serious loss of coolant accident. Read more >

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ROSS

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

Disaster by Design/Safety by Intent #15

Disaster by Design

You probably have noticed by now there’s no shortage of acronyms and abbreviations in the nuclear industry. There are so many that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (sometimes called the NRC) published a report chock-a-block with many of them. Because one can never have too many acronyms, I’ll unveil another one: ROSS, for Race of Safety Snails. Read more >

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The Advanced Cruise Missile, retired in 2007, was stealthy and had a longer range than the currently deployed Air-Launched Cruise Missile. (U.S. Air Force Photo)

Just How New is the New, Nuclear-armed Cruise Missile?

, Washington representative and senior analyst

I have an op-ed in Defense News that explains how deploying the planned new nuclear-armed cruise missile will actually make the United States less secure. Known as the Long-Range Standoff Weapon, or LRSO, it will be significantly more capable than the existing nuclear-armed air-launched cruise missile (ALCM). And for just that reason, by demonstrating that the United States sees this weapon as a valuable military tool, it will undermine higher priority U.S. security goals. Read more >

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