calvertcliffs


Nuclear Plant Emergency Preparedness: Failure to Communicate

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

Disaster by Design/ Safety by Intent #36

Disaster by Design

Nuclear plant owners are required to develop plans for responding to accidents that describe actions to be taken by workers onsite as well as describing communications to local, state, and federal organizations so they can taken actions offsite. Among other things, the emergency plans detail when to activate the sirens that warn people in the community about an accident at the plant. Read more >

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Near Miss at Calvert Cliffs

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sent a special inspection team to Calvert Cliffs (Lusby, Maryland) to investigate electrical fluctuations on the offsite power grid that caused both reactors to automatically shut down on April 27, 2015, and problems with both of the standby emergency diesel generators on Unit 2. The NRC’s investigations identified no violations of regulatory requirements. Read more >

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When Safety Relief Valves Fail to Provide Safety or Relief at Nuclear Plants

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

Disaster by Design: Safety by Intent #6

Disaster by Design

The light water reactors currently operating in the U.S. are either boiling water reactors (BWRs) or pressurized water reactors (PWRs). In both designs, water flowing past the nuclear fuel in the reactor cores gets heated to over 500°F. Water is able to be heated to this temperature because it is pressurized—to over 1,000 pounds per square inch (psi) in BWRs and to over 2,000 psi in PWRs. The 1,000 psi pressure is equivalent to the pressure submerged more than 2,200 feet below the ocean’s surface. Read more >

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Nuclear Power(less) Plants

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

Disaster by Design/Safety by Intent #3

Disaster by Design

The primary purpose of commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. is to generate electricity. When not fulfilling that role, nuclear power plants that are shut down require electricity to run the equipment needed to prevent the irradiated fuel in the reactor core and spent fuel pool from damage by overheating. The March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi in Japan graphically illustrated what can happen when nuclear plants do not get the electricity they require. Read more >

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Flooding at the Nuclear Plant

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

Disaster by Design/Safety by Intent #1

Disaster by Design

The March 2011 disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan did not reveal flooding to be a nuclear safety hazard; it reminded us of this well-known threat. Flooding from internal sources (e.g., broken pipes and failed storage tanks) and from external sources (e.g., heavy rainfall and swollen rivers) had long been recognized as a risk to be managed with an array of flood protection measures. As the following summaries—an abridged sampling among many such events—indicate, there were numerous reminders before Fukushima. Read more >

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