missiles


Why Freezing North Korea’s Weapons Programs Would Make Us Safer

, co-director and senior scientist

Last week, China proposed a way to reduce tensions on the Korean peninsula: Pyongyang would freeze its missile and nuclear programs in exchange for Washington and Seoul halting their current round of military exercises. China also sees this as a way of starting talks between the United States and North Korea, which it believes is necessary to resolve hostilities on the peninsula.

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North Korea Launches Four Missiles “Simultaneously”

, co-director and senior scientist

Yesterday  North Korea launched four ballistic missiles into the Sea of Japan.

The missiles reportedly traveled an average of 1,000 km (620 miles), and landed within 300 to 350 km (185 to 220 miles) of Japan. The four launches were said to be “simultaneous,” leading to speculation they were intended to be a barrage attack to overwhelm a missile defense system.

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North Korea’s February 12 Missile Launch

, co-director and senior scientist

Updated 8 pm EST Sunday

North Korea reportedly launched a medium-range missile Sunday morning local time (about 6 pm Saturday on the US east coast).

People are speculating about what missile it could have been. Based on the range, there are at least two candidates, which would be distinguishable by US intelligence if it was able to observe the launch. Read more >

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Is North Korea Planning a Long-Range Missile Launch?

, co-director and senior scientist

A press story from South Korea reports that the North may be preparing for a missile test launch, possibly in the next few days. Some suggest this could be intended as fireworks for Donald Trump’s inauguration.

While this story talks about the test being of a long-range missile (an intercontinental range ballistic missile (ICBM)) the few details that have been made public don’t seem to support that—although not much is known at this point. Read more >

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Trump and the Nuclear Codes: How To Launch a Nuclear Weapon

, co-director and senior scientist

There has been a lot of talk about the fact that after his inauguration, Donald Trump will have his finger on the “button” used to launch nuclear weapons. But the president does not actually have a “button.”

Instead when he becomes president he will be given nuclear codes that enable him to launch a nuclear strike.

What does that actually mean? Read more >

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