nuclear power safety


Tennessee Valley Authority’s Nuclear Safety Culture Déjà vu

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a Confirmatory Order to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) on July 27, 2017.  An NRC team inspecting the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant in fall 2016 determined that TVA failed to comply with elements of another Confirmatory Order that NRC had issued to TVA on December 22, 2009. Specifically, the 2009 Confirmatory Action required TVA to implement measures at all its nuclear plant sites (i.e., Watts Bar and Sequoyah in Tennessee and Browns Ferry in Alabama) to ensure that adverse employment actions against workers conformed to the NRC’s employee protection regulations and whether the actions could negatively impact the safety conscious work environment. The NRC inspection team determined that TVA was not implementing several of the ordered measures at Watts Bar. Read more >

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Broken Valve in Emergency System at LaSalle Nuclear Plant

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

An NRC Special Inspection Team (SIT) conducted an inspection at the LaSalle Nuclear Plant this spring to investigate the cause of a valve’s failure and assess the effectiveness of the corrective actions taken. Read more >

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Florida’s Nuclear Plants and Hurricane Irma

, senior scientist

Will Florida’s two nuclear plants, Turkey Point and St. Lucie, be able to withstand Hurricane Irma?

Florida governor Rick Scott, the utility Florida Power & Light (FP&L), and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have all provided assurances that they will. But we are about to witness a giant experiment in the effectiveness of the NRC’s strategy for protecting nuclear plants from natural disasters. Read more >

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NRC’s Decision Making: 18 Reasons Why You Are Right, but Wrong

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

As described in a prior blog post, the Unit 3 reactor at the Palo Verde Generating Station had one of two emergency diesel generators (EDGs) explode during a test run. The license issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) allowed the reactor to remain running for up to 10 days with one EDG unavailable. Fixing the heavily damaged EDG would require far longer than 10 days, so the plant’s owner submitted requests to the NRC for its permission to run the reactor for up to 21 days and then up to 62 days with only one EDG available. Read more >

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Marijuana and Nuclear Power Plants

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) adopted regulations in the mid-1980s seeking to ensure that nuclear power plant workers are fit for duty. The NRC’s regulations contained provisions seeking to verify that workers were trustworthy and reliable as well as measures intended to prevent workers from being impaired on duty. The former measures included background checks before workers could gain access to the plant while the latter components included drug and alcohol testing. Read more >

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