nuclear power safety


Nuclear Plant Cyber Security

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

There has been considerable media coverage recently about alleged hacking into computer systems at or for U.S. nuclear power plants. The good news is that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the nuclear industry are not merely reacting to this news and playing catch-up to the cyber threat. The NRC included cyber security protective measures among the regulatory requirements it imposed on the nuclear industry in the wake of 9/11. The hacking reported to date seems to have involved non-critical systems at nuclear plants as explained below.

The bad news is that there are bad people out there trying to do bad things to good people. We are better protected against cyber attacks than we were 15 years ago, but are not invulnerable to them. Read more >

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Cooper: Nuclear Plant Operated 89 Days with Key Safety System Impaired

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

The Nebraska Public Power District’s Cooper Nuclear Station about 23 miles south of Nebraska City has one boiling water reactor that began operating in the mid-1970s to add about 800 megawatts of electricity to the power grid. Workers shut down the reactor on September 24, 2016, to enter a scheduled refueling outage. That process eventually led to NRC special inspections. Read more >

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Turkey Point: Fire and Explosion at the Nuclear Plant

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

The Florida Power & Light Company’s Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station about 20 miles south of Miami has two Westinghouse pressurized water reactors that began operating in the early 1970s. Built next to two fossil-fired generating units, Units 3 and 4 each add about 875 megawatts of nuclear-generated electricity to the power grid.

Both reactors hummed along at full power on the morning of Saturday, March 18, 2017, when problems arose. Read more >

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Nuclear Regulatory Commission: Contradictory Decisions Undermine Nuclear Safety

, director, Nuclear Safety Project

As described in a recent All Things Nuclear commentary, one of the two emergency diesel generators (EDGs) for the Unit 3 reactor at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generation Station in Arizona was severely damaged during a test run on December 15, 2016. The operating license issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) allowed the reactor to continue running for up to 10 days with one EDG out of service. Because the extensive damage required far longer than the 10 days provided in the operating license to repair, the owner asked the NRC for permission to continue operating Unit 3 for up to 62 days with only one EDG available. The NRC approved that request on January 4, 2017.

The NRC’s approval contradicted four other agency decisions on virtually the same issue. Read more >

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Trump Administration Blocks Government Scientists from Attending International Meeting on Nuclear Power

, senior scientist

The Trump administration has barred the participation of US government technical experts on nuclear energy from attending a major international conference in Russia. Read more >

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