nuclear weapons


Whose Finger Is on the Button? Nuclear Launch Authority in the United States and Other Nations

, analyst

Throughout the 2016 presidential campaign, and perhaps even more since Trump’s election, the media discovered a newfound interest in the minutiae of US nuclear policy. One question in particular has been asked over and over—can the president, with no one else to concur or even advise, order the use of US nuclear weapons? Most people have been shocked and somewhat horrified to find that there is a simple answer—yes. Read more >

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Scientists to Congress: The Iran Deal is a Keeper

, co-director and senior scientist

The July 2015 Iran Deal, which places strict, verified restrictions on Iran’s nuclear activities, is again under attack by President Trump. This time he’s kicked responsibility over to Congress to “fix” the agreement and promised that if Congress fails to do so, he will withdraw from it.

As the New York Times reported, in response to this development over 90 prominent scientists sent a letter to leading members of Congress yesterday urging them to support the Iran Deal—making the case that continued US participation will enhance US security. Read more >

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Don’t Make the Same Mistake on Iran that Bush Made on North Korea

, co-director and senior scientist

Press reports say President Trump will likely not certify Iranian compliance with the Iran nuclear deal in the near future, setting up a situation in which Congress can reimpose sanctions and effectively end US compliance with the deal. Read more >

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Well-Deserved Recognition: ICAN Wins Nobel Peace Prize

, manager of strategic campaigns

For most of my professional life going back to the late 1980’s, I have been a nuclear weapons organizer/campaigner.  It’s my life’s work.  Over all these years, no group of campaigners has impressed me more than the good folks with the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN).  Their skill, passion, energy, professionalism and unrelenting doggedness is truly inspiring in our mutual pursuit of a safer world free of nuclear weapons. Read more >

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START from the Beginning: 25 Years of US-Russian Nuclear Weapons Reductions

, analyst

For the past 25 years, a series of treaties have allowed the US and Russia to greatly reduce their nuclear arsenals—from well over 10,000 each to fewer than 2,000 deployed long-range weapons each.  These Strategic Arms Reduction Treaties (START) have enhanced US security by reducing the nuclear threat, providing valuable information about Russia’s nuclear arsenal, and improving predictability and stability in the US-Russia strategic relationship. Read more >

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