nuclear weapons


25 Years Ago Today a President Changed Nuclear Policy Forever. Will This One?

, Washington representative and senior analyst

Today marks the 25th anniversary of the start of the most remarkable and rapid changes ever made in U.S. and Soviet/Russian nuclear posture and policy. Read more >

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Obama @ the UN: Nuclear Options

, Washington representative and senior analyst

Tomorrow, Barack Obama will deliver his last address to the United Nations as president.  What will he say? What should he say?

He is likely to touch on a range of global issues, including climate change. I hope he will find some time to focus on security issues, in particular nuclear weapons.

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The United States, China, and Anti-Satellite Weapons

, China project manager and senior analyst

Many US observers believe anti-satellite (ASAT) attacks could be China’s trump card in a major military confrontation with the United States. But the reality may be exactly the opposite. The United States could have more to gain, and China more to lose, from taking the fight to outer space. A US presidential decision to pursue this advantage would make the United States, not China, the protagonist in a new space arms race that would undermine the security of both nations. Read more >

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A front view of four nuclear free-fall bombs on a bomb cart. Photo: Wikimedia

Turkey Wrap: A Collection of Stories about US H-bombs in Turkey

, Washington representative and senior analyst

On July 15, a portion of the Turkish military launched an attempted coup against the country’s elected government.  While much of the initial coverage focused on the coup itself, soon there was a spate of stories on the fact—alarming to many— that Turkey hosts approximately 50 U.S. nuclear weapons, all B-61 gravity bombs that can be used by U.S. fighter aircraft or bombers.

Here are links to the most prominent pieces, along with some key excerpts. Read more >

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Rethinking Nuclear Deterrence: Korea and No First Use

, China project manager and senior analyst
"Scenes of Atomic Weapons Explosions": A Chinese propaganda poster. The quote from Chairman Mao on the left reads: "The atomic bomb is a paper tiger used by the US reactionary clique to scare people. It appears frightening but in reality it is not."

A Chinese propaganda poster titled, “Scenes of Atomic Weapons Explosions.” The quote from Chairman Mao in red on the left reads: “The atomic bomb is a paper tiger used by the US reactionary clique to scare people. It appears frightening but in reality it is not.”

There are US defense and foreign policy experts who assert that history proves the United States should retain the option to use nuclear weapons to prevent non-nuclear attacks against the United States and its allies. The evidence supporting that assertion is questionable.

The historical record in Europe is ambiguous. Although there was no Soviet attack against Western Europe during the Cold War it is difficult to prove US threats to use nuclear weapons were responsible for preventing it. There is convincing evidence, however, that the fear of US nuclear weapons failed to deter the People’s Republic of China (PRC) from attacking US forces in Korea. Read more >

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