Xi Jinping


China’s Changing Foreign Policy

, China project manager and senior analyst

The global security community is worried about President Trump. The report of the 53rd annual Munich Security Conference suggests his election may lead to a “post truth, post west, post order” world. Vice President Pence and other US government representatives failed to convince the conference otherwise.

That same day, Chinese President Xi Jinping, commenting on the meeting in Munich, confirmed his controversial defense of globalization at the World Economic Forum in Davos was not just an opportune swipe at the nationalist atavism of the new US administration.

It may mark the beginning of a new era in Chinese foreign policy.

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The Trump Administration’s Opening Move to Disrupt US-China Relations

, China project manager and senior analyst

President-elect Donald Trump has a reputation for being disruptive. But it was still surprising that he chose to break with convention and speak directly to Tsai Ing-wen, the President of the Republic of China (ROC) in Taiwan, despite the fact that the United States withdrew its official diplomatic recognition of the ROC in 1979 as a precondition for establishing diplomatic relations with the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Read more >

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Rethinking Nuclear Deterrence: Korea and No First Use

, China project manager and senior analyst
"Scenes of Atomic Weapons Explosions": A Chinese propaganda poster. The quote from Chairman Mao on the left reads: "The atomic bomb is a paper tiger used by the US reactionary clique to scare people. It appears frightening but in reality it is not."

A Chinese propaganda poster titled, “Scenes of Atomic Weapons Explosions.” The quote from Chairman Mao in red on the left reads: “The atomic bomb is a paper tiger used by the US reactionary clique to scare people. It appears frightening but in reality it is not.”

There are US defense and foreign policy experts who assert that history proves the United States should retain the option to use nuclear weapons to prevent non-nuclear attacks against the United States and its allies. The evidence supporting that assertion is questionable.

The historical record in Europe is ambiguous. Although there was no Soviet attack against Western Europe during the Cold War it is difficult to prove US threats to use nuclear weapons were responsible for preventing it. There is convincing evidence, however, that the fear of US nuclear weapons failed to deter the People’s Republic of China (PRC) from attacking US forces in Korea. Read more >

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China in Focus #19: Peaches, Plums and the Challenge of Cross-Cultural Communication

, China project manager and senior analyst

https://www.google.com/search?q=%E6%A1%83%E6%9D%8E%E4%B8%8D%E8%A8%80,+%E4%B8%8B%E8%87%AA%E6%88%90%E8%B9%8A&newwindow=1&client=safari&rls=en&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAWoVChMIjf27_p-QyAIVxy-ICh1vGgN8&biw=1266&bih=676#imgrc=_

Chinese President Xi Jinping likes to use Chinese idioms in his public remarks. While speaking to a select group of U.S. luminaries in Seattle on the first day of a state visit to the United States, President Xi dropped the following Chinese gem on his non-Chinese speaking audience: 桃李不言, 下自成蹊. Read more >

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China in Focus #18: Ground Truth

, China project manager and senior analyst

Thirty years ago this month my first year in China came to an end. What I remember most is that I returned to the United States assured I knew less about China than when I first arrived. It was a year of unlearning. The ground truth of my experience in the country did not support the narratives about China I studied in school.

Every time I return to China the unlearning continues. Read more >

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