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Breaking Containment at Crystal River 3

, former director, Nuclear Safety Project

Role of Regulation in Nuclear Plant Safety #10

The Crystal River 3 pressurized water reactor in Florida was shut down in September 2009 for refueling. During the refueling outage, the original steam generators were scheduled to be replaced. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was reviewing the owner’s application to extend the reactor operating license for another 20 years. The replacement steam generators would enable the reactor to operate through the end of its current operating license period as well as to the end of a renewed license.

But those plans changed drastically when the process of cutting an opening in the concrete containment wall for the steam generator replacement inflicted extensive damage to the concrete. When the cost of fixing the broken containment rose too high, the owner opted to permanently shut down the facility before its original operating license expired. Read more >

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Naughty and Nice Nuclear Nappers

, former director, Nuclear Safety Project

Role of Regulation in Nuclear Plant Safety 9

The Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station in Delta, Pennsylvania is known for its tireless workers. They stop working long before getting tired and nap while on duty. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) treated the nuclear nappers as naughty in 1987 but as nice in 2007. The reason for such disparate handling of the same problem isn’t apparent. Maybe if I took a nap it would come to me in a dream. Read more >

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How to Think about Space-Based Missile Defense

, co-director and senior scientist

UPDATE: In September 2018, UCS released an animated feature and video that explains how space-based missile defense works. Check it out here.

The idea of space-based missile defense system has been around for more than 30 years. There are at least two reasons for its continuing appeal. Read More

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Anticipated Transient Without Scram

, former director, Nuclear Safety Project

Role of Regulation in Nuclear Plant Safety #8

In the mid-1960s, the nuclear safety regulator raised concerns about the reliability of the system relied upon to protect the public in event of a reactor transient. If that system failed—or failed again since it had already failed—the reactor core could be severely damaged (as it had during that prior failure.) The nuclear industry resisted the regulator’s efforts to manage this risk. Throughout the 1970s, the regulator and industry pursued non-productive exchange of study and counter-study. Then the system failed again—three times—in June 1980 and twice more in February 1983. The regulator adopted the Anticipated Transient Without Scram rule in June 1984. But it was too little, too late—the hazard it purported to manage had already been alleviated via other means. Read more >

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Obstruction of Injustice: Making Mountains out of Molehills at the Cooper Nuclear Plant

, former director, Nuclear Safety Project

The initial commentary in this series of posts described how a three-person panel formed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to evaluate concerns raised by an NRC worker concluded that the agency violated its procedures, policies, and practices by closing out a safety issue and returning the Columbia Generating Station to normal regulatory oversight without proper justification.

I had received the non-public report by the panel in the mail. That envelope actually contained multiple panel reports. This commentary addresses a second report from another three-person panel. None of the members of this panel served on the Columbia Generating Station panel. Whereas that panel investigated contentions that NRC improperly dismissed safety concerns, this panel investigated contentions that the NRC improperly sanctioned Cooper for issues that did not violate any federal regulations or requirements. This panel also substantiated the contentions and concluded that the NRC lacked justification for its actions. When will the injustices end? Read more >

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