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Containment Design Flaw at DC Cook Nuclear Plant

, former director, Nuclear Safety Project

Role of Regulation in Nuclear Plant Safety #6

Both reactors at the DC Cook nuclear plant in Michigan shut down in September 1997 until a containment design flaw identified by a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) inspection team could be fixed. An entirely different safety problem reported to the NRC in August 1995 at an entirely different nuclear reactor began toppling dominoes until many safety problems at both nuclear plants, as well as safety problems at many other plants, were found and fixed. Read more >

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Role of Regulation in Nuclear Plant Safety: A New Series of Posts

, former director, Nuclear Safety Project

President Trump seeks to lessen the economic burden from excessive regulation. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated Project AIM before the 2016 elections seeking to right-size the agency and position it to become more adaptive to shifting needs in the future. And the nuclear industry launched its Delivering the Nuclear Promise campaign seeking productivity and efficiency gains to enable nuclear power to compete better against natural gas and other sources of electricity.

In light of these concurrent efforts, we will be reviewing momentous events in nuclear history and posting a series of commentaries on the role of regulation in nuclear plant safety. The objective is to better understand under-regulation and over-regulation to better define “Goldilocks” regulation—regulation that is neither too lax nor too onerous, but just right. That better understanding will enable us to engage the NRC more effectively as the agency pursues Project AIM and the industry tries to deliver on its promise. Read more >

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Nuclear Leaks: The Back Story the NRC Doesn’t Want You to Know about Palo Verde

, former director, Nuclear Safety Project

As described in a recent All Things Nuclear commentary, one of two emergency diesel generators (EDGs) for the Unit 3 reactor at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generation Station in Arizona was severely damaged during a test run on December 15, 2016. The operating license issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) allowed the reactor to continue running for up to 10 days with one EDG out of service. Because the extensive damage required far longer than 10 days to repair, the owner asked the NRC for permission to continue operating Unit 3 for up to 62 days with only one EDG available. The NRC approved that request. Read more >

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UCS Causes Meltdowns at US Nuclear Reactors (no, really)

, former director, Nuclear Safety Project

Disaster by Design/ Safety by Intent #46

Disaster by Design

You won’t see it on our website. You won’t find it in materials we mail out to our members. You won’t hear it in the webinars we hold for prospective donors. But UCS caused a meltdown at a U.S. nuclear power reactor. Well, that’s only half the story. UCS caused meltdowns at two U.S. nuclear power reactors. In our defense, they (being the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the nuclear industry, started it. We only finished it. Read more >

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The Importance of Nuclear Training

, former director, Nuclear Safety Project

Disaster by Design/Safety by Intent #20

Disaster by Design
In nuclear power safety, training has nothing to do with steam engines, diesel engines, passenger cars, freight cars, and cabooses. In nuclear power safety, training encompasses education, experience, and qualifications seeking to ensure that workers know what to do, and what not to do. Training is not just a good idea, it’s the law. Read more >

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