nk satellites


North Korea’s New Rocket Engine Test: What Does It Mean?

, co-director and senior scientist

North Korea announced on Tuesday that it had successfully tested a new, larger rocket engine. It says the engine will allow it build a more capable satellite launcher—a “rocket for the geo-stationary satellite.”

Many outside North Korea, however, see its satellite launch program as a way of developing technologies that it could use to build long-range military missiles.

What do we know about the new engine, and what might its implications be? Read more >

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North Korea is Launching a Rocket Soon: What Do We Know About It?

, co-director and senior scientist

North Korea has announced that it will launch a rocket sometime in the next two weeks to put a satellite in orbit for the second time. What do we know about it, and how worried should we be? Read more >

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Markus Schiller’s Analysis of North Korea’s Unha-3 Launcher

, co-director and senior scientist

North Korea’s launches of its Unha-3 rocket in April and December 2012, along with the recovery and analysis of debris from the December launch, have provided a lot of new information that was not previously available. That information has allowed me and others to reassess our earlier conclusions about Pyongyang’s rocket, and has led to some significant changes. Read more >

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South Korea’s Analysis of North Korea’s Rocket Debris

, co-director and senior scientist

South Korea recently released a short summary (in Korean) of its analysis of the pieces it recovered of North Korea’s first stage from its Dec. 11 satellite launch. Parts of the analysis have been showing up in the South Korean press in the last few days.

Here is a translation that I did of that summary (with the help of Google and a student who wants to remain anonymous). Corrections from readers are welcomed. Read more >

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Debris from North Korea’s Launcher: What It Shows

, co-director and senior scientist

Press reports now say South Korea has recovered four pieces of the first stage of the Unha-3 rocket that North Korea launched on December 11 (U.S. time). Since all these pieces were found in approximately the same area, they must all have come from the first stage. Read more >

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