paloverde


Fatal Accident at Arkansas Nuclear One

, former director, Nuclear Safety Project

 Role of Regulation in Nuclear Plant Safety #11

The Fatal Accident

As described in Fission Stories #139 and illustrated in Fission Stories #181, a temporary crane removing a component weighing 525 tons on March 31, 2013, in the turbine building of the Unit 1 reactor at Arkansas Nuclear One near Russellville, AR collapsed. The dropped load struck the turbine building floor with considerable force, then rolled and fell through an opening to cause further damage on a lower floor. One worker was killed and eight others injured by the accident. Read more >

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Obstruction of Injustice: Columbia Generating Station Whitewash

, former director, Nuclear Safety Project

There’s been abundant talk recently about obstruction of justice—who may or may not have impeded this or that investigation. Rather than chime in on a bad thing, obstruction of justice, this commentary advocates a good thing—obstruction of injustice. There’s an injustice involving the Columbia Generating Station in Washington that desperately needs obstructing. Read more >

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Empty Pipe Dreams at Palo Verde

, former director, Nuclear Safety Project

Regulation and Nuclear Plant Safety #3

In July 2004, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) inspectors at the Waterford nuclear plant in Louisiana discovered that a portion of piping in a standby emergency system that would provide makeup water to cool the reactor in event of an emergency had been kept emptied of water, jeopardizing the ability to prevent core damage. This finding was shared with owners of similar reactors across the country. Days later, workers at the Palo Verde nuclear plant in Arizona discovered that sections of the emergency system piping for all three reactors was being deliberately emptied of water. Read more >

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NRC’s Decision Making: 18 Reasons Why You Are Right, but Wrong

, former director, Nuclear Safety Project

As described in a prior blog post, the Unit 3 reactor at the Palo Verde Generating Station had one of two emergency diesel generators (EDGs) explode during a test run. The license issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) allowed the reactor to remain running for up to 10 days with one EDG unavailable. Fixing the heavily damaged EDG would require far longer than 10 days, so the plant’s owner submitted requests to the NRC for its permission to run the reactor for up to 21 days and then up to 62 days with only one EDG available. Read more >

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Nuclear Regulatory Commission: Contradictory Decisions Undermine Nuclear Safety

, former director, Nuclear Safety Project

As described in a recent All Things Nuclear commentary, one of the two emergency diesel generators (EDGs) for the Unit 3 reactor at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generation Station in Arizona was severely damaged during a test run on December 15, 2016. The operating license issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) allowed the reactor to continue running for up to 10 days with one EDG out of service. Because the extensive damage required far longer than the 10 days provided in the operating license to repair, the owner asked the NRC for permission to continue operating Unit 3 for up to 62 days with only one EDG available. The NRC approved that request on January 4, 2017.

The NRC’s approval contradicted four other agency decisions on virtually the same issue. Read more >

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